The Vanished Town of Glastenbury and The Bennington Triangle


Let’s showcase someone else’s work for a change. Chad spins a wonderful yarn about New England history as depicted in the life, and death of the small villages and settlements that used to cling tenuously to the wooded slopes of Vermont. Cartography and the sense of place help tie everything together, and this is as much a story of the land as it is the story of it’s inhabitants. Enjoy

Obscure Vermont

Those who know me know that I’m a huge cartography buff. That love really perpetuated when I was 10, when my mother bought me a DeLorme atlas of Vermont, and I became enthralled with it, thoroughly memorizing every detail I could. But what is it about maps that are so irresistible to me?

Maybe because of their limitless potential, and their ability to unlock the mysteries of our world. Maps tell us how things in this world relate to one another, they take data and turn it into something tangible, something understandable, and maybe something that provokes thought or feelings. Several different types of information can be conveyed at the same time, melding several different ideas into a united idea. Lines to convey topography, more lines to convey boundaries between rock layers, towns, states and countries. More lines for faults, colors for bodies of water, forest land and types of climates. Maybe it’s…

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